Egg Replacer Powder (Compare to Ener-G®)

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If you’ve got an allergy to eggs, baking can be tough. Thankfully, there are options out there to make your egg-free baking life simpler, like this egg replacer powder.  It’s a homemade version of one of the best egg replacers that I have ever used.

ingredients for making egg replacer powder with glass bowl and whisk

I love making homemade versions of pricey store-bought items, like homemade coconut butter, homemade coconut milk, or homemade almond butter.

Well, imagine my glee when I figured out how to replace the expensive powdered egg substitute that we’d been buying for years.

This egg replacer recipe is for everyone – whether you, or someone you know, has a food allergy, or if you have ever run out of eggs while in the middle of a recipe.

Of courses, if you run out of eggs in the middle of a recipe you can run to the store, but having an egg substitute on hand is a much more frugal way to go.

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The Making of this Egg Substitute

Ever since my son was diagnosed with a life-threatening food allergy to egg whites (and other foods) at the age of 5 months, baking and cooking have become a bit of a challenge.

At first, it felt completely daunting to me.

How on earth was I supposed to bake without eggs?

Well, the truth is, his (and my) other later dietary changes have proven to be even more challenging (going gluten-free and even sugar-free) than the “egg issue”.  And on top of that, his autism (Asperger’s Syndrome) diagnosis was an even harder issue to navigate than the food allergies ever were.

However, adopting an individual’s or family’s diet to meet special needs is still a very real challenge. So real that it causes a great deal of stress on whoever is responsible for taking care of the meals.

This is actually one of the main reasons that I started this blog –to make food preparation easier and more wholesome for those dealing with special dietary needs.   Because I know how hard it is to deal with all of this and I need easy solutions wherever I can find them.

You too, huh? If I can get it done quicker, healthier, and cheaper, then I am all over it.

And I really enjoy helping others meet this challenge as well.

powdered egg replacer in glass bowl

Finding a good substitute for eggs in baking and cooking can be a bit of a chore, but there are a number of options.  One of my long-time favorites was Ener-G’s Egg Replacer.

It’s a powdered egg substitute that can be used in quite a few dishes that call for eggs, egg whites, or egg yolks.

I bought this product for years, but typical of my “Can I do this myself” mentality, one day I set out to see if I could make this powdered egg replacer myself.  The main reason I wanted to do it was to save money, but the other is that there is one ingredient in their product that wasn’t entirely desirable so I wanted an alternative.

Well, it worked.

I found a recipe for powdered egg replacer on the internet, made some changes, and now I have a quick, easy, cheaper and additive-free way to replace eggs in loads of recipes.

The inspiration for this recipe was a blog called Celineyum.  Unfortunately, the blog is now defunct.

whisk mixing powdered egg substitute in glass bowl

Other Egg Substitutes

There are other egg substitutes that can work as well, but it all depends on what the eggs’ purpose is in the recipe.

This powdered egg replacer works as a binder and as a leavening agent so it works quite well in almost all baking recipes.

Other options are:

bananas
flax eggs
chia eggs
gelatin (please use grass-fed. This is a good brand, as is this one, and this one.)
yogurt
tofu
cornstarch (please use non GMO, organic like this brand)
pureed fruits
buttermilk
applesauce
vinegar and baking powder
pumpkin

and more!

Addressing Carbohydrate Concerns

The only issue with this powdered egg replacer is that it is high in carbs.

Typically, this kind of starch is considered to be pretty unhealthy, but there is some interesting information that has come out to possibly counter this thinking.

You can use all or mostly all arrowroot instead of the other starches, as it is thought to have helpful nutritional qualities, but there is more information coming out about other starches like tapioca and potato starch in the resistant starch realm.

From what I am reading, you should try to purchase raw starches if this is a consideration for you.

So as long as you aren’t on a low carb diet, though this seems at first glance that this is an egg replacer that is devoid of nutrition, that might not entirely be the case.

powdered egg replacer in glass jar with spoon

Starches vs Flours

It’s very important to get the correct ingredients for this recipe. Which leads to the questions, “Is tapioca starch the same as tapioca flour” and “Is potato starch the same as potato flour?”

The answers to these questions is confusing but here they are. Tapioca starch is the same as tapioca flour, however potato starch is not the same as potato flour. Hmmm….would have been nice to have some consistency here, but this is just the way that it goes.

Potato flour is the whole potato dried up and ground. Potato starch is just the starch portion.

Tapioca flour / starch is the ground up root of the tapioca plant. It’s the same thing that makes up tapioca pearls.

How to Use

To substitute for 1 egg, use one rounded 1/2 tablespoon egg replacer powder and 2 tablespoons (1/8 cup) water (filtered water preferred).

If your recipe calls for egg whites beaten stiff, beat the egg replacer powder with water until somewhat stiff (this won’t work for heavily egg-white-based dishes like meringues, however. Believe me, I learned this the hard way when I tried making a meringue with this. Hint: It didn’t turn out at all like a meringue :-).)

For recipes calling for egg yolks, use 1 rounded 1/2 tablespoons egg replacer powder with 1 tablespoon water.

To substitute for 1 egg white, use 1/2 tablespoons egg replacer powder and 2 tablespoons water.

Recipe Notes and Substitutions

  • Time Saving Tip: Rinsing the spoon off after using this replacer gets tedious really fast. I leave a ½ tablespoon spoon in my container at all times. See my post on Saving Time with Measuring Tools.
  • Tip Card: I recommend putting a little card with the measuring instructions on the outside of your Powdered Egg Replacer container so that it will always be handy when you need it :-)!
  • Act Fast: You should always get whatever you are making into the oven or onto the stove as soon as possible after mixing in the egg replacer. It tends to lose its effectiveness the longer you wait (due to the leavening agents in it).
  • Tapioca Alternatives: You can substitute cornstarch or arrowroot for the tapioca starch with I think minimal difference. You could also sub out the potato starch, but it is a bit “heftier” than the other starches so I would use it if you can. You could also possibly use white flour for either, but then your egg replacer will not be gluten-free.
  • Typically it’s recommended to blend the water and egg substitute powder together prior to adding to a recipe, but I have done it both ways and had it work out.
  • For a homemade baking powder option, see Aluminum & Corn-Free Baking Powder.

Special Diet Notes

  • whole30 – this recipe is whole30 compliant if you use my homemade baking powder
  • paleo & AIP – Although some say that potatoes are paleo, you can use arrowroot or additional tapioca for the potato starch for AIP or paleo. Just note that the recipe might not work quite as well.
powdered egg replacer in glass jar with spoon

Egg Replacer Powder (Compare to Ener-G®)

This Homemade Powdered Egg Substitute is great for those with egg allergies, but also great when you’ve run out of eggs. Works just like Ener-G.
4.87 from 15 votes
Print Pin Rate
Course: Dressings, Seasonings, etc.
Cuisine: AIP, Dairy-Free, Gluten-Free, Grain-Free, Paleo, Vegan, whole30
Keyword: egg substitute

Ingredients

Instructions

  • Place all ingredients in a bowl.
  • Combine well.
  • Store in an airtight container.

Notes

    • Time Saving Tip: Rinsing the spoon off after using this replacer gets tedious really fast. I leave a ½ tablespoon spoon in my container at all times. See my post on Saving Time with Measuring Tools.
    • Tip Card: I recommend putting a little card with the measuring instructions on the outside of your Powdered Egg Replacer container so that it will always be handy when you need it :-)!
    • Act Fast: You should always get whatever you are making into the oven or onto the stove as soon as possible after mixing in the egg replacer. It tends to lose its effectiveness the longer you wait (due to the leavening agents in it).
    • Tapioca Alternatives: You can substitute cornstarch or arrowroot for the tapioca starch with I think minimal difference. You could also sub out the potato starch, but it is a bit “heftier” than the other starches so I would use it if you can. You could also possibly use white flour for either, but then your egg replacer will not be gluten-free.
    • Typically it’s recommended to blend the water and egg substitute powder together prior to adding to a recipe, but I have done it both ways and had it work out.
Special diet notes
  • whole30 – this recipe is whole30 compliant if you use my homemade baking powder
  • paleo & AIP – Although some say that potatoes are paleo, you can use arrowroot or additional tapioca for the potato starch for AIP or paleo. Just note that the recipe might not work quite as well.

Nutritional information is provided as a courtesy and is merely an approximation. Optional ingredients are not included and when there is an alternative, the primary ingredient is typically used. We cannot guarantee the accuracy of the nutritional information given for any recipe on this site. Erythritol carbs are not included in carb counts since they have been shown not to impact blood sugar. Net carbs are the total carbs minus fiber.

Looking for other handy dandy allergy-friendly kitchen subs?  How about these:

Homemade Coconut Milk (smoother!)
Easiest Almond Milk Ever
Powdered Sugar Substitute
Homemade Rice Milk
Easy Chocolate / Carob Chips (dairy free with sugar-free option)
Homemade Vegetable Broth

I’d love to hear how this works for you!

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Recipe Rating




 

402 Comments

  1. Hello! I have tried to use this egg replacer in 2 recipes but the eggs rise well but they sink in. The vanilla cake I made with it was so soft that it crumbled as soon as I touched it. Do you add the extra baking powder or soda the recipe suggests when replacing eggs or no? If anyone knows how to fix it please let me know

      1. It was a regular cake. Recipe from how to cake it. The cake were rising nicely then when it was out of the oven it just collapsed. Also very hard to work it and it crumbled when I de moulded it. Please help! ?

        1. Hi there. I am so sorry for the delay. I’m not following your question about baking soda, etc. Can you please explain? Thank you!

  2. Hey, I dont have access to Potato starch, you mention you can white flour instead of potato starch, do you mean AP flour by white flour?
    Thank you.

    1. Hi there. Soooo sorry for the late reply to this. Yes, that’s what I meant. Hope it works out well for you!

  3. Hi Adrienne,

    I have a daughter who was born with a Genetic Disorder. I try to cook and bake as much as possible to avoid processed foods, additives, colors etc in store bought foods and items. I have seen potato and tapioca floors out there, is this the same as starch or should I use the items labeled as starch only for this egg substitute?

    Thank you,
    Judith

    1. Tapioca flour and starch are the same thing. Potato starch is not the same as flour so you you need to get the starch. Confusing, but that’s the way it goes :)! I should add that to the post – good question!

  4. Is there a temperature requirement for the water? I’ve used other egg replacer recipes which direct the water to be hot, then wait fir the product to ‘set up’.

  5. Hi!! Can I use regular egg white substitute for the chocolate silk pie recipe since I’m not allergic to eggs? Thank you

    1. Hi there – for which part of the pie? And I am SO embarrassed about that photo! I haven’t made the recipe in forever either so please don’t hold me to it. It might not be that good!!!! Yikes!! I’m going through things as much as I can to make recipes better!!

    2. Sorry it takes me so long to get back to you been very busy person but want to make your chocolate velvet hi so bad and thank you for all your help!!

  6. 5 stars
    After a long time finally my new allergen free baking cookbook arrived and I was so upset when noticing that nearly every recipe calls for ener g egg replacer which you can’t buy here 🙁
    Luckily I found your recipe! So you absolutely made my day! Thanks 🙂

    1. That’s so great! Happy baking!! Please let me know how it goes for you. I think the recipe needs a little tweaking but it works well for us!

  7. 5 stars
    hi!! i stumbled upon your DIYs and im gonna have to keep your site forever in my favourites list XD! i normally measure all ingredients using a scale as i find that it provides the most accuracy.
    Do you think the results would still be the same for the egg replacer if i converted your cup measurements to grams?
    i’m assuming that you did not tightly pack the starches while measuring them.

    1. Hi there! Yes, I would think it should be the same. I didn’t tightly pack them. Hope it works well for you!

    1. The shelf life is the same as the shortest shelf life of the ingredient that you use–so it depends on the ingredients that you bought for it.

  8. Thank you for all of your recipes. I’ve used quite a number already. I’ve also used this egg replacer for a while, but thought I should finally ask you this: approximately how many milliliters are in 1 rounded half tablespoon? It would really help me when I am replacing 10 eggs from your flax bread recipe (I always make a double batch).

    1. Good question and well, even the internet doesn’t seem to know that. I guess I could try to redo the recipe w/ another type of measurement. If you use 1/2 T it should probably work out. Or just add a little more to that.

  9. 4 stars
    Hi, I’m trying to veganize and make gluten free a pound cake recipe that calls for 5 eggs. I’m new to baking, but since I am using a gf flour instead of cake flour I think there needs to be a little protein so do you think mixing this powder with aquafaba instead of water would make it more egg like? Or perhaps adding chickpea flour to the powder (and mixing with water) , although I am unsure of what ratio to use. Or would it be better to use 3 powder eggs and 2 aquafaba equivalents (or the reverse)? Thanks in advance.

    1. Hi there – sorry for the delay – I am having some issues w/ comments on my site. I haven’t used aquafaba but I don’t think you need to use it just b/c of the flour being GF. I don’t think that protein is that high in aquafaba and adding chickpea flour will make it heavier.

      I think you will like this recipe – let me know how it turns out!

  10. 5 stars
    Could you recommend how to replace the meringue or dried eggs in frosting for cakes/cookies? I’m not looking for a different recipe just what I could substitute the meringue for in the current recipe.

    Love the info in the article!

  11. Aloha! Excited to give this a try! Do you know if this would work in a custard recipe? Trying to “vegan”ize a Hawaiian chantilly cream/custard but haven’t found a good egg/you replacer yet!

    1. Hi there. Sorry but I don’t have that feature in my recipes yet. I hope to. Do you have a way to calculate this on your end?

  12. 5 stars
    Thanks for this amazing receipe….can you please tell me the timing…i.e. when to add this mix to other ingredients like sugar and flour and then how long should I mix all these ingredients.

    1. You are so welcome! Just blend well before adding and then after adding blend like you would with anything else to combine well. If that isn’t what you meant, please let me know!

  13. I’ve wondered for 6 yrs if there was a way to make this, thanks! Does this product work in a GF cake recipe that calls for 3 eggs?

  14. I would love recipe where refrigeration is not needed I don’t have one . where is the cheapest place place to get refrigerator biscuits so I can stuff with mozzarella cheese? Being poor haits disadvantages Thank You

    1. Hello there. This recipe doesn’t require refrigeration. I don’t personally buy refrigerator biscuits so I don’t know :). Sorry about that. I assume Aldi. They aren’t the healthiest though..maybe try beans and rice instead?

  15. Hi, This sounds to be a good egg substitute, but I can’t get potato starch where I live. Can you please
    Suggest me some other substitute for potato starch. Thankyou waiting for your reply.

    1. You can try another starch like tapioca or arrowroot, but the resulting product will be a bit different. I think it will work OK. Let me know!

  16. My niece has stomach problems and is allergic to wheat, dairy and eggs so I tried to make her lemon poppyseed mini cakes and used gluten free flour, coconut oil and egg replacer, (recipe called for 2 1/4 cup flour,1 1/3cup butter, 5 eggs) but when I mixed it up it was like paste and liquid y on top, put it in the pan and baked it, (350) and the oil and water separated and came to the surface, looked like I was deep frying, needless to say it came out like hardtack, what’s wrong ??