In Search of The Best Essential Oils – What Makes a Good Essential Oils Company – Part Two

Wondering Which Essential Oils Company is Best? What about the "Therapeutic Grade" claims the MLM oils companies make? Come find out all you ever wanted to know about oils companies and more!

This path of figuring out which is the best essential oils company has been hard work.

I had NO idea that when I started out trying Young Living’s Thieves blend that I would be digging this heavily into a bunch of oils companies to find out which brand gave my family the biggest bang for the buck.

There’s been a lot of info to sort through, and life has been little [a lot] crazy over the past 6 months.)

Read on to see what I’ve been learning.

First of all, if you missed my earlier posting on essential oils, you might want to revisit:

A Skeptic Looks at Essential Oils
Are Essential Oils a Scam? – Peppermint, Wintergreen, and More
Which Essential Oils Company is Best – Part One

A lot has happened since those posts.

I had questions and more questions to ask–I think I probably almost drove a few oil company folks crazy in the process  :-) — but I feel pretty good about what I am going to share with you now.

But before I tell you which company I am going to be recommending, let me fill you in on how I got there and give you more information on essential oils in general.

(It wouldn’t be much fun without a little more suspense, right :-)?)

Finding the Best Essential Oils Company

In trying to sort out which company I wanted to recommend to you (and where I wanted to buy my oils from), I:

contacted a bunch of companies
– looked at tons of websites
talked on the phone with employees and owners of essential oils companies
thought agonized a lot
– thought some more
– spent a bunch of money on oils (and I do mean a bunch)

I really took this very seriously.  I wanted to provide my readers with the best essential oils company for the money.

Now of course, I can be wrong–and I do think that there is more than one good oil company out there.

But I am as sure as I can be right now that I have found a good one to recommend to you all.

What to Look for in an Essential Oils Company

1.  The Essential Oils Company Should Sell Quality Oils

The oils need to be as high quality as possible without being astronomical in price.  They should be:

extracted properly (under low temperature and low pressure)
– produced from plants grown in their indigenous locations (where they grow naturally)
– made from wild-crafted (indigenously grown and/or not removed entirely when harvested) and/or organic plants if at all possible

I have concerns along these lines about some of the companies that I looked into.  For example, Young Living is a very popular essential oils company.  In fact, if you recall from my post on A Skeptic Looks at Thieves Oil, and my post on Peppermint, Wintergreen, and More, you will see that I was at first very pleased with their oils.

However, I am concerned that Young Living’s oils are almost all sourced in the U.S.  That is great from the standpoint of keeping shipping costs to the U.S. low, but many of the plants from which their oils are derived are not indigenous to the U.S. and so I think that is one thing to consider.

But let’s see what else our “search for the best essential oils company turns up.”  One company might not have everything we want…….

2.  The Essential Oils Should Be Pure

The oils must not have anything added to them, nor have anything taken out that should be “left in”

Apparently it is commonplace for oils “experts” or oil companies to add things to essential oils in order to make them “go farther” and thus be cheaper to produce.  The companies can either make more profit by selling an inferior product at a high price, or they can offer inferior product and an apparently “great price.”

I heard and read a lot about oil companies “monkeying around” with their oils in order to make them:

– smell better (By distilling oils longer or heating them, the “herby” smell of some oils is changed to make them more palatable.)
– pass quality and purity tests (Some “oil experts” are apparently smart enough to know what the tests are looking for, so they add things to the oils or alter them in other ways to make them “pass” the tests.  This is the case with oregano oil.  Some companies will adulterate their oregano oil to have carvacrol levels come to where they want them to be.)
– more profitable by adding fillers like propylene glycol and others

Additionally, oils should, when possible, be extracted with steam only–not with chemical solvents.  Who wants more chemical “nasties” on or in their bodies?  Not me.

Basically, the essential oils I want to use should be only oils.

Nothing added.  Nothing taken away.

You can read more about the adulteration of essential oils here.

3.  The Essential Oils Should Be Sold at an Affordable Price

The oils should be within the reach of most consumers’ budgets.

Of course, as with everything, there are varying degrees of quality.  The company that I have chosen has very high quality.  However, even that company’s owner admits that there are comparable, even higher quality oils available, but the prices of these oils are so exorbitant as to make them unaffordable to most people.

4.  The Essential Oils Should Be Effective

The oils must work.

Of course, we want oils to do something, and not just smell nice.  I can use plain vanilla extract for that :-).

5.  The Company Should Provide Education

Ideally, the oils company will offer opportunities to learn how to properly use oils to provide healthy options for the treatment of medical and emotional issues.

Of course, there is a huge amount of such information on the internet and in books like the following.

I’m working on growing my Essential Oils library and have the following book on my wish list.  It’s one that has the best reviews on Amazon and gets in to the nitty gritty of medicinal use, which is what I am the most interested in.

I’ll be back in the future with more on these books, but this one looks like a real winner:

Essential Oils Books

How’s that for a lot of information to chew on?  See why this has been tough?

Well, hang in there with me.  I’ll be back real soon with more information.

For more in the series:

– Which Essential Oils Company is Best? – Part 1
– Which Essential Oils Company is Best – Troubles with the Oils Industry – Part 3
– Young Living vs. doTERRA – Part 4
– Are Multi-Level Marketing Oils Worth It? – Part 5
Distillation, Bias, Vomit and Personal Attacks – Part 6
– Announcing “the Best” Essential Oils Company – Part 7

 **Finally, you can get my Report on Essential Oils, 10 Things You NEED to Know BEFORE You Buy for FREE by visiting here and signing up for my newsletter.**

What do you think?  Anything you would add to this list?

The information here is for entertainment purposes only. Please consult a medical professional before changing your diet, exercise program, or before trying any natural remedies.

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  1. Quick update, I just checked the Native American Naturals website and it is the exact same EO as Rocky Mountain Essential oils! Very cool!

  2. Thanks for the quick responses, yeah I know some companies can be a little touchy…Anyway, I’m glad my RM purchase was not a bust! Just ordered some more from NAN. :)

  3. Martin Hresko says:

    Why is “indigenous locations” a relevant criteria? Do you have any research showing plants grown in their indigenous locations produce better oils than plants grown in non-indigenous locations?

    • I don’t have research, but I have read this in several places. It makes common sense that a plant will be more vibrant growing where it is native to. It needs fewer or no pesticides as well. The same goes for humans. I wouldn’t thrive on the moon, for example. I know that’s stretching the analogy a bit, but I assume you get the point. Animals are the same way. They don’t really want to live in a zoo — they do better in their native habitat.

      I just read this same information on the doTERRA blog this morning.